Vitamin C ——- An essential Anti-aging Nutrient

Aging is like a syndrome of changes in your body. It is progressive and irreversible. Aging brings frustration and despair to the person.  Diets which lack vitamins and minerals can cause widespread nutritional disorders, including degenerative diseases and compromised immune systems. Vitamins play a substantial role in the basic nutritional diet for our body and slow the aging process.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the US encourages people to eat 5 to 9 servings of vegetables and fruits a day as part of a healthy diet to reduce risk of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s (National Cancer Institute (NCI) of US 5-A-Day for Better Health Program )

Vitamin C or Ascorbic Acid is one of the essential nutrients for our health that is not synthesis by our body. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin and need to be replenished by our body on daily basis. So it is very important to take vitamin C rich foods to meet its daily requirements for the body.  Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant which protects our cells, enhance immunity. Vitamin C prevents many degenerative diseases and also increases body resistance to diseases.

Vitamin C is a cell protector vitamin. It boosts our immunity and is a amazing antioxidant. It helps in recycling of other antioxidants required for the body. All our ligaments, tendons and collagen need Vitamin C to work properly. For a healthy life, daily intake of Vitamin C supplements along with other antioxidants like Vitamin E, carotendoids and flavonoids.

What does Vitamin C do in your body?

Vitamin C acts as a strong reducing agent and prevents your body from the damaging effects of free radicals. This way it delays aging.  Vitamin C helps in the synthesis of collagen and carnitine and neurotransmitters in the body. It is an effective co-enzyme which increases the absorption of non-haem iron from the gastrointestinal lining. Vitamin C is beneficial for degenerative diseases of Eyes. It promotes the production of collagen in skin.

What is the recommended vitamin C dosage?

FDA recommends 60mg Vitamin C per day. This dose is recommended to prevent diseases like scurvy, bleeding gums and wound healing. Experts says 1000mg per day is required have optimal health and to achieve its antioxidant benefits. Overdosing is rare and there is no reported case of Vitamin C intoxicity.

Although vitamin C is readily available in foods, data from the third U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III Part 1 1988–91) suggest that the median vitamin C consumption from diet in adult males and females is 84 mg and 73 mg daily, respectively (Life Sciences Research Office:“Third Report on Nutrition Monitoring in the United States.” Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office,1995).

Good sources of Vitamin C

Fresh fruits and green vegetables are the good source of Vitamin C.

Vitamin C is mainly found in fruits and vegetables (Haytowitz DB: Information from USDA’s Nutrient Data Bank.J Nutr125:1952– 1955,1995).

United States Department of Agriculture and National Cancer Institute guidelines recommend the ingestion of at least five fruits and vegetables daily (Lachance P, Langseth L: The RDA concept: time for a change?Nutr Rev52 :266– 270,1994).

 

  • Don’t peel potatoes, Vitamin C is just beneath its skin.
  • Half cup of Guava contains 188mg of Vitamin C
  • One orange gives 50 mg of Vitamin C
  • Grapefruit gives 200mg of Vitamin C
  • Half cup red sweet pepper offers 142 mg of Vitamin C if taken in raw form
  • Green sweet pepper have 60 mg of vitamin C
  • Half cup of strawberries contains 49mg of Vitamin C.

Reference:

  • National Cancer Institute (NCI) of US 5-A-Day for Better Health Program
  • Auer, B.L., Auer, D. and Rodgers, A.L. (1998) The effect of ascorbic acid ingestion on the biochemical and physiochemical risk factors associated with calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 36, 143-148.
  • Cameron, E. and Campbell, A. (1974). The ortho-molecular treatment of cancer. II. Clinical trial of high dose ascorbic acid supplements in advanced human cancer. Chemical and Biological Interactions 9, 285-315.
  • Haytowitz DB: Information from USDA’s Nutrient Data Bank.J Nutr125:1952– 1955,1995 .
  • Lachance P, Langseth L: The RDA concept: time for a change?Nutr Rev52 :266– 270,1994 .
  • Life Sciences Research Office:“Third Report on Nutrition Monitoring in the United States.” Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office,1995

 

Author: Dr Rubina Mushtaq

Comments are closed.